Dench City The Truth about GDA's

Yes, yes clickbait title, so what, I’m trying to get my SEO game up. 

Today I’m going to talk about the magical Glucose Disposal Agent, it claims all manner of benefits for breaking down carbs in the body. 

A quick Google search of the term and you’ll be welcomed by many blog post articles mainly from supplement companies or distributors, call me sceptical but these are hardly great, non-bias sources of information. 

According to one blog post … 

“Users of this type of dietary supplement have reported being able to eat larger quantities of food while staying leaner, having more visually "full-looking" muscles, and also being able to reach lower levels of body fat during fat loss-focused dieting phases without having to turn to harsh stimulants that can take their toll on the adrenal glands with prolonged use.” [1]

I mean WOW! Some serious claims right there, change GDA for fast-acting Insulin and I wouldn’t have known the difference. 

So in true Dench City style let’s break it down.

WTF is a GDA?

An acronym for Glucose Disposal Agent, it claims to aid the uptake of glucose from the bloodstream into the muscle tissue where it can be used straight away for fuel or can be stored in the muscles and liver as Glycogen to provide energy when needed [2].

 

Ingredients

There seems to be a common group of ingredients used in these supplements. Unfortunately, one of them is not a legal, altered form of Metformin. 

 

Cinnamon Extract

This has a claim of a range of benefits, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, heart health, insulin sensitivity and more. 

There are some studies that claim to improve insulin action in the brain and mediate metabolic activity to decrease liver fat and improve glucose homeostasis [3]. It does seem to be of help and interest to scientists for the treatments of diabetes and its many other benefits but does need more solid research in order to substantiate the clinical effects of this wonderful spice [4]. 

 

Alpha-lipoic Acid

Alpha-lipoic acid is an antioxidant that’s found to naturally occur in the body of animals and humans (what’s the difference), to break down carbohydrates into energy. It’s found in foods such as red meat, carrots, beets, spinach, broccoli, and potatoes. With it being an antioxidant it is thought to provide protection to the brain and liver [5]. Alpha-lipoic Acid is usually supplemented for help with weight loss, diabetes, memory loss, skin health, and other health conditions [6]. 

 

Banaba Leaf 

A herb with a blend of compounds that seem to be catered towards being anti-diabetic in nature. It can inhibit the digestion and absorption of carbs to a degree and can also aid in the reduction of blood sugar [7]. There are some very interesting studies in regards to this, 

a proprietary blend containing an aqueous extract of Banaba was used. This product also contained extracts of green tea, green coffee, and Garcinia. Twenty-four human subjects with mild type 2 diabetes were given three tablets three times daily. A 13.5% average decrease in blood glucose levels was reported, and no adverse effects were observed [8]. 

 

Chromium

An essential mineral that is found in food and plays a role in how carbs are broken down in the body, found in veg, whole grain, beef and poultry, fruits and dairy. [9]

This might play a role in carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism by potentiating insulin action. Although the precise mechanism for this activity has not been identified [10]. It may be helpful for people with type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance (prediabetes).

 

There are obviously more ingredients used but the ones above seem to be most common. Different companies may use similarly based ingredients to accompany the above like, apple cider vinegar powder, Bioperine, green tea/coffee extract etc. 

Conclusion 

There is definitely proof of insulin and blood sugar controlling activity in these ingredients but is it enough to actually see a difference? Who knows, bodybuilding and strength athletes have a lot of variables that come into play nowadays, is this person natural? Is this person on GH? Is this person’s diet clean? Is this person training properly? 

Would taking this herbal supplement make much of a difference? I personally don’t think so, but each to their own, if you’re having good effects however perceived then great, you do you. 

Dan @ Dench City


References

[1] - Glucose Disposal Agents: What, when, why and how?. (2022). Retrieved 5 January 2022, from https://www.only-approved.com/blog/glucose-disposal-agents-what-when-why-and-how/

[2] - What is a glucose disposal agent | Time 4 GDA | 180 Capsules. (2022). Retrieved 5 January 2022, from https://www.time4nutrition.co.uk/articles/time-4-gda-glucose-disposal-agent/

[3] - Sartorius, T., Peter, A., Schulz, N., Drescher, A., Bergheim, I., Machann, J., Schick, F., Siegel-Axel, D., Schürmann, A., Weigert, C., Häring, H.-U. and Hennige, A.M. (2014). Cinnamon Extract Improves Insulin Sensitivity in the Brain and Lowers Liver Fat in Mouse Models of Obesity. PLoS ONE, 9(3), p.e92358.

[4] - Kawatra, P. and Rajagopalan, R. (2015). Cinnamon: Mystic powers of a minute ingredient. Pharmacognosy Research, [online] 7(5), p.1. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4466762/ 

[5] - Webmd.com. (2019). Alpha-Lipoic Acid: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, and Warning. [online] Available at: https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-767/alpha-lipoic-acid

[6] - www.medicalnewstoday.com. (2018). Alpha-lipoic acid: Benefits and side effects. [online] Available at: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323738 

[7] - Frank, K., Patel, K., Lopez, G. and Willis, B. (2021). Banaba Leaf Research Analysis. examine.com. [online] Available at: https://examine.com/supplements/banaba-leaf/ 

[8] - Miura, T., Takagi, S. and Ishida, T. (2012). Management of Diabetes and Its Complications with Banaba (Lagerstroemia speciosa L.) and Corosolic Acid. Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : eCAM, [online] 2012. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3468018/ 

[9] - R. Morgan Griffin (2008). Chromium. [online] WebMD. Available at: https://www.webmd.com/diet/supplement-guide-chromium#1 

[10] - ods.od.nih.gov. (n.d.). Office of Dietary Supplements - Chromium. [online] Available at: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Chromium-HealthProfessional/#en1